Projects

North I-25 (Denver to Wyoming)

I25fullgraphicAllSegmentsInterstate 25 plays a significant role in the quality of life and economic vitality of a growing northern Colorado, from US 36 in the Denver metro area to SH 1 in Wellington. According to the State Demography Office, the population of Larimer County, currently 316,000, is expected to increase 52 percent by 2040. Similarly, Weld County’s population of 268,400 is expected to increase 111 percent by 2040.  The Colorado Department of Transportation (CDOT) forecasts that this population growth will increase the number of vehicles making daily trips along the I-25 corridor by 60 percent in 2040.  To provide the same, or better, quality of life and economic vitality for the future, improvements are needed on I-25. The North I-25  project has a strategy to provide modern and effective multi-modal transportation solutions for residents, employees, freight, and visitors traveling between Denver and Wyoming.

I-25 Improvements

To provide funding flexibility, CDOT is designing the corridor in segments and phases according to the Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS).

Initial Improvements:

  • Two general-purpose lanes and one tolled express lane in each direction—US 36 to SH 7 and SH 66 to SH 14
  • Reconstructed interchanges and bridges
  • Express bus service
  • Incorporation of intelligent transportation systems 
  • New carpool and transit facilities

Based on existing revenues, the ultimate build-out of the project is expected by 2075.  It is anticipated that continuous improvements will be made in accordance with the FEIS phasing plan from now until 2075.

Improvements by ultimate build-out:

  • Three general purpose lanes and one tolled express lane in each direction on the entire corridor
  • Additional carpool and transit facilities

Opportunity for Advancement

To finish the improvements before 2075, CDOT is exploring funding from additional sources. CDOT is also investigating innovative project delivery methods to help lower the project’s cost and speed delivery.  These include public-private partnerships (3P), which combine public funds with private investors; and design-build (D/B) contracts, which combine final design and construction into one contract. At a 20 percent level of design, alignments and major details are designed and right-of-way requirements are identified, allowing CDOT to issue a D/B contract.

Potential funding sources include:

  • Senate Bill 228
  • Presidential Challenge for Risk and Resilience
  • Emergency Relief Funds
  • Transportation Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Act
  • National Freight Funds
  • Local funds
  • Faster Safety Funding

To provide funding flexibility, CDOT is designing the corridor in segments and phases according to the Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS).

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