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Studies

Eastern Colorado Mobility Study

April 2002 - The Eastern Colorado Mobility Study was undertaken to assist the Transportation Commission of Colorado in making investment decisions regarding infrastructure improvements to enhance freight mobility in a large part of the state. The study area includes all of eastern Colorado, extending to the I-25 corridor on the west and Colorado’s borders on the north, east and south. Keywords: Studies, Non-Highways, Active Construction

Northwest Corridor EIS

Northwest Corridor Transportation and Environmental Planning Study - July 2008 - In 2003, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), in cooperation with the Colorado Department of Transportation (CDOT), initiated a National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process to study the need, merits, and possible impacts of potential transportation improvements in the Northwest Corridor of the Denver metropolitan area. The Notice of Intent to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) appeared in the Federal Register dated July 21, 2003, and identified the proposed action as: “an improved connection between the western terminus of the Northwest Parkway in Broomfield County and the SH 58, I-70, or C-470 freeway systems to the south in Jefferson County. This connection is considered necessary to address the need for system linkage, to provide for existing and projected transportation demand, to improve safety, and to enhance modal interrelationships, within the Northwestern Quadrant of the Denver Metropolitan Area.” Keywords: Studies, Non-Highways

Ports to Plains

This study was a joint effort by four state Departments of Transportation (DOTs) including Colorado, Texas, Oklahoma, and New Mexico. It includes I-70 from I-25 east to US 40/287 and then south along US 40/287 to the Colorado/Oklahoma border. The purpose was to create a Development and Management plan for the Ports to Plains Corridor, which outlines a proposed plan for the corridor and serves as an essential tool for securing federal funding for corridor development. It contains several elements that improve the transportation network’s ability to move people and goods. Nearly 1,400 miles long, the corridor consists of 511 miles of 4- to 6-lane roadway, 755 miles of 2-lane roadway, and 113 miles of roadway in metropolitan areas. Keywords: Studies, US Highways, Interstates

Region 3 Intersection Priority

This files includes the Final Region 3 Intersection Priority Study. All of the supporting indexes are NOT included with this file and can be requested to be sent via regular mail. Please email [email protected] for more information

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