CDOT jobs that require head lamps? Yeah, we do that.

How CDOT’s Division of Maintenance and Operations transforms roads while most Coloradans are asleep

The dedicated teams of CDOT’s Division of Maintenance and Operations are often busy responding to incidents of all kinds while most Coloradans are fast asleep. The critical role that CDOT’s round-the-clock efforts play in keeping Colorado's roadways functioning smoothly is nothing to overlook.
 A group of CDOT trucks on a road at sunset.
A group of CDOT trucks on a road at sunset.

When it comes to CDOT job requirements, “nocturnal” isn’t usually listed. But many of our crucial tasks can only happen after the sun goes down. In fact, they wouldn’t happen at all if we couldn’t work around the clock. They’re big jobs.
CDOT maintains and repairs over 23,000 lane miles of highway, more than 3,400 bridges and 30 tunnels statewide. We also plow state highways, help stranded motorists and even do avalanche mitigation in the winter months.

The dedicated teams of CDOT’s Division of Maintenance and Operations are often busy responding to incidents of all kinds while most Coloradans are fast asleep. At times, these incidents include clearing car wrecks, snow, rockslides, and repairing roadway damage. The critical role that CDOT’s round-the-clock efforts play in keeping Colorado's roadways functioning smoothly is nothing to overlook.

Incident Response and Snow Removal

Bright sunny mornings in Colorado can quickly turn to snow by the afternoon. The unpredictable nature of the state's climate can lead to a variety of incidents at any hour — day or night. CDOT’s Traffic Incident Management team is on call 24/7 and is responsible for responding to these unexpected, traffic-related events.

CDOT trains our highway maintainers to use heavy, Class A Commercial Driver’s License (CDL) equipment (like snowplows) so they’re prepared to handle everything from car crashes to hazardous spills.

During the winter months, CDOT's snow fighters battle heavy snowfall and ice to ensure that roads are clear, and Coloradans can get to their destinations safely by the time morning commuters hit the highways.

An orange, CDOT snowplow with its headlight on clears snow at night.
An orange, CDOT snowplow with its headlight on clears snow at night.

Rockslides, Floods and Avalanches - Oh my!

Colorado's mountainous terrain is not without its challenges. Rockslides, floods and avalanches can block highways and put travelers at risk without any warning. CDOT teams clear the debris from these natural weather incidents and repair the roadway if any damage is done.

CDOT and its sister agency, the Colorado Avalanche Information Center, regularly monitor and control 278 of 522 known avalanche paths located above Colorado highways. One of the ways CDOT reduces risks of avalanches and approaches avalanche mitigation is by triggering controlled avalanches before they can pose a threat to motorists. In the case that an avalanche does impact one of Colorado’s roadways, CDOT’s Division of Maintenance and Operations is there to help clear the snow and debris.

Maintenance and Infrastructure Improvements

CDOT's night crews also carry out essential maintenance and improvement work during the overnight hours. The absence of heavy traffic during these hours allows for more efficient and safer execution of projects such as road resurfacing, bridge repairs and signage updates.

Light shines on a group of CDOT workers maintaining road conditions at night
Light shines on a group of CDOT workers maintaining road conditions at night.

The men and women of CDOT’s Division of Maintenance and Operations continually demonstrate their unwavering commitment to the state's transportation network. Whether responding to incidents like road or bridge damage, rockslides, floods or avalanches, CDOT's nighttime heroes are always working hard to keep Colorado moving. At CDOT, we do more than you think.